Tag Archives: The Food Connection

MuseumEats WildCrafting Workshops

Are you curious about how to identify, pick and eat wild foods?
Our friends at MuseumEats present a fascinating Wildcrafting Weekend Intensive for folks who want to learn more about wild foods as medicine, food and art!
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The workshop series will kick off with a Wildcrafting Potluck hosted by The Food Connection on April 27th. Please RSVP.
Bring your foraged food and art, as well as stories and questions you have about the wild!

 

Wildcrafting Weekend Intensive

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In light of its ethics of holism and community, MuseumEats has expanded its focus beyond food collection and recruited some talented and inspiring facilitators for a Wildcrafting Weekend Intensive from April 29-May 1. This weekend will not only include education about what/how/why to pick wild foods, but will also touch on Weaving with Native and Foraged Materials, Plant-Spirit Medicine, Aromatherapy, and Wild Dynamic Permaculture.
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Workshop Schedule:
April 29 – Aroma Blending for Mother’s Day
April 30 – Wild Weaving
May 1 – Plant Spirit Medicine & Food Collection
May 1 – Intro to Wild Dynamic Permaculture
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Under the guidance of Camille Flanjak, Bea Edelstein, Kelly Ablard, and Lori Snyder, we’ll be identifying and collecting wild mushrooms, greens, shoots, and bushes for food, craft, and medicine, and learning how the integration of people into natural wild systems is more efficient than mono-crop agriculture.
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Join us for an awesome and intense weekend of wildness!
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About MuseumEats:
MuseumEats is an organization that aims to build community and the connection between source and stomach. We conduct private and pubic foraging (wildcrafting) workshops with a holistic perspective: from sustainability and permaculture, to hipster food-ism and plant spirit medicine.
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About Camille:
Camille Flanjak started facilitating MuseumEats Wildcrafting Workshops to meld her 2 biggest passions: food security and her voracious palate. Find her in the woods drinking Coenobium and putting plants in her mouth.
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A Lively East Van Ecosystem: The Brewery Creek Community Garden

by Jenny van Enckevort & The Food Connection

Nestled between Mount Pleasant Elementary School and Guelph Park — better known among locals as Dude Chilling Park — is one of East Vancouver’s hidden ecosystems: the Brewery Creek Community Garden. This thriving green space on East 7th Avenue is cushioned from the noise and traffic of the Broadway and Kingsway corridors. It’s a place where you’re likely to hear the sounds of kids making the most of recess, people playing tennis, birds singing, and folks of all stripes enjoying the urban outdoors.

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This is where we are rising to the challenges of tending a community garden plot, for Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House and The Food Connection. We have a dream location with full sun exposure, and we’ve done plenty of experimenting to learn what food will thrive in these growing conditions.

This year we’ve decided to create an herb garden, which will provide fresh ingredients for the many types of free food workshops we offer at the Neighbourhood House. We’re choosing perennial plants that will grow for many months, return year after year, and support sustained harvesting. We also want to do our part to help conserve water.

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To our surprise, the first thing that really takes off is wheat, which grows tall and sturdy through early spring. Our crop will be too small to produce flour, so today we harvest just the grains while the plants are still green. The young wheat grains are called freekeh, and they pack a nutritious punch. We’ll toast the freekeh, and add it to salads for a crunchy texture and nutty flavour.

In the early evening, people are dropping by to water their own garden plots, and one woman asks if I’m watering the wheat. I show her how the stalks are perfect for transplanting to create row dividers and shade. Their roots will also help to hold soil and water for a happy garden.

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Next, we’re ready for the yogurt pots we’ve saved up over the winter. They’re made from #5 plastic, making them reusable without emitting chemicals into food. We’ve already poked the bottoms full of holes, and now we fill them with dirt. We space them evenly through the garden, then sink them into the ground, leaving the brims showing. Each time we water the garden, we’ll fill up these little reservoirs, which will distribute water to our plants’ roots, keeping the soil moist even in the heat of summer.

A few members of the Little Diggers Gardening Club come by to check on the progress of their garden patch. They find their own plants by reading names aloud, and compare their growth against their friends’ seedlings.

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Back in our own plot, we’re ready to plant the fragrant seedlings we selected during this year’s Stone Soup Festival. We also plant seeds we’ve saved from our home gardens, like nasturtium and calendula. Then we scatter some red clover seeds for ground cover that will attract pollinators and beneficial insects.

With my hands in the dirt, I chat with people who are searching the grounds for ideas to bring home with them, or taking photos of plants they want to learn about and identify. I’m excited to tell them about our plans for the food we’re growing.

For our juicy chicken workshop later this month, we’ll be ready to pick thyme, chives, rosemary, and sage. When summer is in full swing, we’ll hand-select leaves of mint, lemon balm, and chamomile to create garden cocktails with our own naturally fermented sodas.

We finish the day’s work by putting rakes, shovels, and watering cans back into the shed, surveying this pocket of fertile land, and leaving at sundown with a sense of satisfaction and anticipation.

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